Gelven’s “Commentary on Heidegger’s Being and Time” – Annotated

 

III.INTRODUCTION

Martin Heidegger’s Sein und Zeit first appeared in German in 1927; the English translation, Being and Time, appeared in 1962.1 Since the appearance of this work, the reputation and influence of its author has spread to such international dimensions that it may be said that Heidegger is the most important and widely influential philosopher of the twentieth century. Even now, as the century enters its final decade, no thinker is more significant in terms of intellectual impact and controversy. There are many who deeply resent his works, who detest his personal association with Nazism in 1933, who defy his most fundamental principles. But even among these, his most ardent enemies, he is recognized as the singular dominating force with which to be reckoned. Among his countless admirers he is considered the greatest European philosopher since Immanuel Kant. Interest in this Freiburg philosopher is in no way waning; indeed the future seems to promise ever expanding respect, and in some cases even reverence, for his vast accomplishments. Although Heidegger has written voluminously since 1927, there remains little doubt that Being and Time will continue to be recognized as his major work, and shall be for many decades to come.

1Being and Time, trans. John Mcquarrie and Edward Robinson (New York: Harper & Row, 1962).

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