Category: 1 COACHING


Uner Xardener does not turn unen Carrot into unen Potato
but ripens dun Carrot as unen Carrot.
Oner Coach does not turn onen Carrot into onen Potato
but ripens don Carrot as onen Carrot.
— Tiwaz 20170724

EXCERPT FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_skills_in_Canada

Roles of the Life Skills coach

The Canadian Alliance of Life Skills Coaches and Associations (CALSCA) offers the following definition of a Life Skills coach:

“A Life Skills Coach is a trained para-professional who is able to facilitate groups, model and evaluate skills and support individualized learning. Coaches work from their hearts, demonstrating with their lives, their growth, and through their range of emotion and depth of experience, the effective use of the skills that they offer to their participants. Coaches put themselves on the line, human to human (Allen, Mehal, Palmateer, & Sluser, 1995; Conger, 1973, p. 3; Curtiss & Friedman, 1973; Curtiss & Warren, 1973).” [25]

Life Skills coaches’ facilitation tasks include facilitating problem-solving, creating a safe climate/environment, and managing conflict. Life Skills coaches also teach and model helpful group behaviours and balanced self-determined behaviour (BSD), share their own experiences and self disclose as members of the group, and share their resources and knowledge of processes in the service of the group goals. Furthermore, Life Skills coaches help group members accomplish their goals, and they encourage the group to reflect on and discuss its development and ways of working together.[26]

Life Skills coaches have expertise in both content and process and are flexible in moving back and forth between the two.[27] Life Skills coaches are also flexible in their choice of leadership (influencing and intervention) styles; they shift from directive, to harmonizer, to laissez faire to democratic according to the needs and abilities of the group at different stages of its development.[28] The Life Skills coach encourages group members to share the leadership role with him/her as the group matures.[29]

Regardless of the stage of the group’s development, it is the Life Skills coach’s responsibility to ensure that the Life Skills lessons are meeting the group’s needs.[30]

Humber faculty member Michael Glassbourg

 

“I have worked with Tiwaz a few times over the years.  He has two rare abilities: one is he is a fantastic script editor. The second is he can connect your writing with who you are emotionally.  He truly does help you write the best script possible. I recommend him highly as both an editor and a life skills coach.” — Michael Glassbourg 200903091448

Michael Glassbourg, program co-ordinator
416.675.6622 ext. 4489
michael.glassbourg@humber.ca

 

Humber faculty member guru on documentary film circuit

FROM: http://www.humber.ca/stories/ken_danby_documentary.htm

Published: April 8, 2008

What do a letter carrier, a manager of a book store, an operations manager for a clothing factory and a sheet metal worker have in common? They are all jobs that Humber faculty member Michael Glassbourg had before becoming one of Canada’s most successful documentary filmmakers. With an enthusiastic and free spirit he says “I did whatever it took to survive.” The Montreal-born Glassbourg started touring Canada as an actor shortly after leaving mid-way through a graduate program at Concordia University. The acting eventually led to writing and directing and after 25 years he moved into film and television production.

 

 

see d Video that I directed for Michael under d Name

Andreas Blackwell

 

Submitted on 2007/11/17 at 10:06

I met Schneider a few years ago, and since then, I have been fortunate enough to receive his professional guidance on several occasions. So, if you will, allow me to sing the praises of this remarkable individual. Most recently, Schneider has helped me to negotiate my way through new working relationships in my efforts to become an established screenwriter. His guidance, as always, has been invaluable. He promotes the kind of concrete problem solving that leads to long term professional and personal development. After we examined my problem together, he helped me set achievable goals and develop a workable plan to reach them. But he did more than simply strategize. As a life skills professional, Schneider is one of a rare breed: he possesses the gift of empathy. He takes the time to understand not only what you are saying, but what you are feeling. And he goes beneath the surface of any problem. For me, he facilitated an examination of both the professional challenges I was facing as well as their deeper aspects—which in the long run, will be the most helpful of all. I can honestly say that, through working with Schneider, I have grown personally and professionally.

(signed: Brian Lynch)

 

“Life skills are problem-solving behaviours appropriately and responsibly used in the management of personal affairs. The life skills model encourages you to develop a broader repertoire of behaviour so that you can choose appropriate and self-fulfilling responses to a variety of situations. This certificate is responsive to individual needs and interests in order to enhance interpersonal and group leadership skills. Life skills coach training is conducted according to current learning principles and has increasingly been recognized as an important addition to the field of adult education. The model is a proven method for use with groups, and life skills coach trainers are able to apply the fundamental principles of life skills to any group work experience. For more information, call 416-415-5000, ext. 2126, or e-mail cecommunity@georgebrown.ca.” (from   Life Skills Coach Training Certificate  )

calsca.gif (1671 bytes) 

What is a Life Skills Coach ?

A Life Skills Coach is a trained para-professional who is able to facilitate groups, model and evaluate skills and support individualized learning. Coaches work from their hearts, demonstrating with their lives, their growth, and through their range of emotion and depth of experience, the effective use of the skills that they offer to their participants. Coaches put themselves on the line, human to human (Allen, Mehal, Palmateer, & Sluser, 1995; Conger, 1973, p. 3; Curtiss & Friedman, 1973; Curtiss & Warren, 1973). (from CALSCA)